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    Hints of Balsam and Pine  from our  corner of the Adirondacks. Adirondack Letters
    No.5: A Mowing Story.
    Hints of Balsam and Pine: Nature Reflections in a minor key from our quiet corner of the Adirondacks. For Fourpeaks Guests and anyone who ever dreamed about a wilderness getaway. CLICK & GO!  (On this page.)   Adirondack Letter No.5A: "A Mowing Story, October 2004."   Adirondack Letter No.5: "A Mowing Story, December 2000."   More stuff in An Adirondack Miscellany.   (On the next page.)   List and Links to all the Adirondack Letters in this series.  

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    And receive occasional Adirondack Letters like this.


    "A Mowing Story" Adirondack Letter No.5A
    Subject: "A Mowing Story." Adirondack Letter No.5
    Date: Wed, 27 Oct 2004 17:51:32
    From: < YourAdirondackGuide@4peaks.com >
    To: < youremailname@youremail.address >

    To:    Fourpeaks Visitors
    At:    < youremailname@youremail.address >

    Dear Fourpeaks Visitor,

    Subject: A Mowing Story

    Our mountain land is dotted with pretty fields and
    meadows--islands of light in a sea of black branches and green
    shade. These are ancient homesites where the soil offered
    resistance over the years to the encroaching forest when the
    places were abandoned. Standing inside one of them we get an idea
    of what it must have been like for the early pioneers to carve a
    home out of wilderness.

    By the time we got here in '68 the edges were fast growing in. We
    hired a helper and set to work with chain saws, a chipper and a
    full size farm tractor with a heavy duty rotary mover.

    Each field was defined by the age and type of woody plants that
    had moved in and by the stone fences and sharp till lines that
    marked the edge of cultivation. By the early 70's Halsey Straight,
    the Perkins farm, Hamilton and the other early homesites (seven in
    all) were restored to their original size and aspect. We cleaned
    the stone cellars and stabilized the hand-dug wells. Later we
    added some far fields and logging headers to the list of open
    places and named them High Meadow, Partridge and Second Drive.

    Today our place is a natural garden. Oversize perhaps (700 acres
    in all), but filled with interesting plants and other living
    things. Woods roads and hiking trails are our garden paths (20
    miles of them with over a hundred beauty spots). The homesites and
    adjacent fields we've kept open over the years are the focal
    points--Williams, Bowton, Perkins and the others.

    Late October--when the wildflowers are done and the last of the
    asters, goldenrod and milkweed have gone to powder and seed--it's
    time to mow. Like any garden it takes work to keep up.

    The best days are mowing days, good sun and a clear sky. Two turns
    around the edge to start. Overhanging branches that spoil the line
    must be cut by hand. Deadfall is pushed back beyond the line or
    crushed under the heavy blades.

    The mowing pattern is set for the longest straight run and the
    least unproductive travel. The field's shape and grade determines
    what's possible. The mowed strips are about 30 feet wide--5 or 6
    passes with my 6 foot mower. It takes a good eye to keep the rows
    straight.

    The slow movement of the machine allows for a close observation
    of natural things. Plant types, their concentration and vigor, as
    they vary with the soil, exposure and the amount of rain. The
    rocks and old stumps to be avoided in the back fields. Field mice
    that run from the noise of the machine, bringing always to mind
    the lines of Burns. The familiar shapes of Basset, Wainwright and
    Clements. Sun, moon and clouds. Small yellow and white butterflies
    that dart between the withered stalks and dried pods.

    The last of it got done just a few days ago. I went with Becky to
    Camp Rock and we enjoyed the view to the East and the manicured
    look of the fields, the even rows. First frost yesterday but
    crocus, daffodil and the few exotic bulbs she put in for next
    Spring are well underground. I made room in the North Shed and
    Willy put away the Case--a tight maneuver I can't manage myself.
    Today, it's weather for a good woodfire indoors.

    Thanks for reading this. If you've ever been a guest here, CLICK
    http://4peaks.com/fgift.htm for an attractive offer to revisit our
    new-mown fields with mountain views. If you've never been, check
    the up-to-date Fall and Winter Availability Calendars at
    http://4peaks.com/femail0.htm and make some time. There's a lovely
    quiet season coming up.

    Till then please visit On-Line:
    http://4peaks.com/ "Explore our 700-acre rest and play-ground."
    http://4peaks.com/fcamp.htm Backcountry Camps in a Hidden Valley.
    http://4peaks.com/foamen.htm "Luxury Camping"
    http://4peaks.com/fotrails.htm Walks with views & Beauty spots.
    http://4peaks.com/fgstbndx.htm "Meet our guests!"

    Your Adirondack Guide,

    Martin

    P.S. If you liked this letter, save it for the links, and tell a
    friend! If you didn't like it, please send it back with "REMOVE"
    as the subject. Thanks.

          Member Whiteface Mountain Visitors Bureau        
       Member Lake Placid/Essex County Visitors Bureau

    ******************************************************************
    This is #5 of a really occasional letter, "Hints of Balsam and
    Pine from our Corner of the Adirondacks," for Fourpeaks guests or
    anyone who ever inquired about a Fourpeaks Backcountry Getaway. To
    see them all CLICK http://4peaks.com/fkhint.htm To get off our
    list send this letter back (reply) with "REMOVE" as the subject.
    ******************************************************************


    "A Mowing Story" Adirondack Letter No.5
    Subject: "A Mowing Story." Adirondack Letter No.5
    Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2000 14:20:54
    From: < YourAdirondackGuide@4peaks.com >
    To: < youremailname@youremail.address >

    To:    Fourpeaks Visitors
    At:    < youremailname@youremail.address >

    Dear Fourpeaks Visitor,

    Our mountain land is dotted with pretty fields and
    meadows--islands of light in a sea of black branches and green
    shade. These are ancient homesites where the soil offered
    resistance over the years to the encroaching forest when the
    places were abandoned. Standing inside one of them we get an idea
    of what it must have been like for the early pioneers to carve a
    home out of wilderness.

    By the time we got here in '68 the edges were fast growing in. We
    hired a helper and set to work with chain saws, a chipper and a
    full size farm tractor with a heavy duty rotary mover.

    Each field was defined by the age and type of woody plants that
    had moved in and by the stone fences and sharp till lines that
    marked the edge of cultivation. By the early 70's Halsey Straight,
    the Perkins farm, Hamilton and the other early homesites (seven in
    all) were restored to their original size and aspect. We cleaned
    the stone cellars and stabilized the hand-dug wells. Later we
    added some far fields and logging headers to the list of open
    places and named them High Meadow, Partridge and Second Drive.

    Today our place is a natural garden. Oversize perhaps (700 acres
    in all), but filled with interesting plants and other living
    things. Jeep roads and hiking trails are our garden paths (20
    miles of them with over a hundred beauty spots). The homesites and
    adjacent fields we've kept open over the years are the focal
    points--Williams, Bowton, Perkins and the others.

    Late October--when the wildflowers are done and the last of the
    asters, goldenrod and milkweed have gone to powder and seed--it's
    time to mow. Like any garden it takes work to keep up.

    The best days are mowing days, good sun and a clear sky. Two turns
    around the edge to start. Overhanging branches that spoil the line
    must be cut by hand. Deadfall is pushed back beyond the line or
    crushed under the heavy blades.

    The mowing pattern is set for the longest straight run and the
    least unproductive travel. The field's shape and grade determines
    what's possible. The mowed strips are about 30 feet wide--5 or 6
    passes with my 6 foot mower. It takes a good eye to keep the rows
    straight.

    The slow movement of the machine allows for a close observations
    of natural things. Plant types, their concentration and vigor, as
    they vary with the soil, exposure and the amount of rain. The
    rocks and old stumps to be avoided in the back fields. Field mice
    that run from the noise of the machine, bringing always to mind
    the lines of Burns. The familiar shapes of Basset, Wainwright and
    Clements. Sun, moon and clouds. Small yellow and white butterflies
    that dart between the withered stalks and dried pods.

    The last of it got done just a few days ago. Louise and I walked
    to Camp Rock and enjoyed the view to the East and the manicured
    look of the fields, the even rows. Two inches of snow yesterday.
    Willy and I made room in the Camp Barn and put away both tractors
    along with the CJ2 and the International. Today, it's ten below.

    Thanks for reading this. If you've ever been a guest with us, go
    to http://4peaks.com/fgift.htm to learn about our midweek specials
    and free upgrades. Come see us again. If you've never been--think
    about it. There's a lovely quiet season coming up. And please
    visit us On-Line:

    http://4peaks.com/ "A 700-acre private rest and play-ground."
    http://4peaks.com/fcamp.htm Pretty Camps in a Hidden Valley.
    http://4peaks.com/fotrails.htm Walks with views & Beauty spots.
    http://4peaks.com/fgstbndx.htm Photo Guest Book--What they said.

    Your Adirondack Host,

    Martin Schwalbaum

    P.S. If you liked this Letter, CLICK HERE to Tell a Friend!
    If you didn't like it please reply to this with "REMOVE" in the
    subject heading. Thanks.

            Member Whiteface Mountain Visitors Bureau
       Member North Country Chamber of Commerce 518-563-1000

    *************************************************************
    This is   No.5  of a really occasional   Letter,  "Hints of
    Balsam and   Pine  from our Corner  of the Adirondacks,"  for
    Fourpeaks guests   or  anyone  who   ever   inquired about  a
    Fourpeaks   Vacation/Getaway. To get off this list reply with
    "REMOVE" in the subject heading.
    *************************************************************

    Get on our mailing list. CLICK HERE  (Easy Form.) to get on our mailing list
    And receive occasional Adirondack Letters like this.

    The Hunter's Shanty in the Adirondacks. Currier and Ives litho, 1861. CLICK HERE for An Adirondack Miscellany.An Adirondack Miscellany   Newspaper and Magazine articles, Books and lots more.  
    Ice storm of the Century Devastates Northcountry.January 1998
    Town of Jay Happy 200th Birthday Party at the 1829 Southmayd Stone House May 1998
    Natives and Outsiders at the Jay Old Covered Bridge. June 1998
    Jane McCrae Murdered by Indians in Ft. Edward NY. July 1777
    Adirondack Great Camps: Adventures in the Wilderness.
    Miss P, the famous www.Internet web purrcat, interviews Tramp, our Fourpeaks barking cocker.  
    Ironman USA comes to Fourpeaks.  
    Chickadees In Winter   
    Flying Critters on your Adirondack Vacation.
    Adirondack Letters: "Hints of Balsam and Pine from our corner of the Adirondacks."
    AuSable River Swimming: Where the Pools Are Never Crowded, And Water Slides Are Nature's Own (New York Times)
    A new novel about Fourpeaks: Moss Krupnick's Daughters of Utopia, 196 pages, $9.98
    For your Adirondack experience--"Stay Awhile In Style!" Plattsburgh-Republican November 2002.
    NATURE WITHIN REACH: Luxury Camping. (July 2004, Southwest Airlines SPIRIT (In-flight Magazine.)
    Annual Jay Yard Sale. (First Sale August 19, 2006.)
    Glamping. (Glamorous Camping.) (Jan-Feb, Nov-Dec 2008, Women's Adventure Magazine.)
    "Imagine a place that preserves the charm of the nineteenth-century back-country dwellings . . ." ADIRONDACK LIFE, 2006 Collectors Issue.

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    Are you in this picture? Fourpeaks hosts now welcome paying guests to a 700-acre rest and playground for vacations in the Adirondack Great Camp tradition. Couples appreciate Fourpeaks secluded settings. Outdoor loving families have fun exploring our accessible wilderness. Folks with dogs enjoy the open spaces to run their pets. A private nature rereat. For a vacation away from it all.    Are you in this picture?  CLICK HERE to find out!    [More about this at Frequently Asked Questions.]

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